Aboriginal sites of New South Wales

Kings Tableland Aboriginal Site, Wentworth Falls. A rocky knoll is topped by a group of large grinding grooves, plus carved images of wallaby and emu tracks. On the eastern side of the hill there is an occupation cave. Koonadan Historic Site, a Wiradjuri ceremonial

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Aboriginal Grinding Grooves at Kings Tableland Sydney

The Gundungurra people used Kings Tableland as a meeting place with neighbouring groups traveling (walkabout) and walking along their traditional walking track (The Great Western Highway and the Ingar Fire Trail which today is a picnic area with a dam/pool) The Gundungurras camped here on their way to Wentworth Falls and Katoomba for employment as late as the turn of the 19th century.

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FileAboriginal grinding grooves, Dobroyd Head, New South

Aboriginal grinding grooves, Dobroyd Head, New South Wales.jpg (509 215; 325 pixels, file size 310 KB, MIME type image/jpeg) This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons . Information from its description page there is shown below.

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Terramungamine Reserve and the Terramungamine Rock Grooves

Terramungamine Reserve area was part of the traditional country of the Tubbagah People of the Wiradjuri Nation and an important gathering area for tribes throughout the region. It is the site of the Terramungamine grinding grooves that were used by the Aborigine people for sharpening their tools and weapons. Dubbo Central West NSW

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Identifying Aboriginal Sites Aboriginal Heritage

The Sydney Basin is one of the richest provinces in Australia in terms of Aboriginal archaeological sites. There are thousands of Aboriginal sites, more than half of which contain rock art, and in Sydneys sandstone belt at least 1500 rock shelters have been discovered to contain cultural deposit.

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Ngambri Grinding Grooves YouTube

Aug 01, 20110183;32;A visit to see the Ngambri Axe Grinding Grooves on Tuggeranong hill Theodore. Located on the slopes of Tuggeranong Hill in the Canberra suburb of Theodore is a substantial Aboriginal site of worn

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Aboriginal Sites Awareness Aboriginal Heritage

potential for axe grinding grooves. Axe Grinding Grooves (Above) The grinding grooves are made from Aboriginal people sharpening their stone axe heads. The axes were constructed from hard volcanic stone fastened to a wooden handle. To sharpen the axe, water is put on to the wet rock and the axe is rubbed backwards and forward until the stone is

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Guide to Aboriginal sites and places Creative Spirits

Aboriginal grinding grooves. Because Aboriginal people needed water to wet the surface of the softer rock when they sharpened their tools grinding grooves (top right) are usually found close to water. Axes were made of hard but smooth river stones, firmly fixed to

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ABORIGINAL AXE GRINDING GROOVES

Aboriginal grinding grooves. The aim is to have a permanent written and photographic record of this important part of the heritageof all Australians. Management works around Aboriginal grinding grooves, such Tas stock and erosion control, help preserve the places for future generations. Are Aboriginal Axe grinding Grooves Protected?

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